Keloid scar

The trauma which caused them can be very minor, such as spots, insect bites or scratches, yet they can grow larger than the initial wound.

What do they look like?

  • These scars are often very thick, purple or red, itchy and can even be painful. 
  • The trauma which caused them can be very minor, such as spots, insect bites or scratches, yet they can grow larger than the initial wound. 
  • They can happen to anyone, but they also run in families and more commonly occur in people with darker skin types. 
  • They can occur on any body-site, but are particularly common in earlobes (post-piercing), chests/breasts and shoulders/backs (trauma or post-acne). 

 

How can this scar be improved? 

  • Scars like these are difficult to treat and have often had several attempts at treatments before. 
  • Scars like this can respond well to a combination of laser, steroid injections and scar therapy; the combination of these treatments gives the most success in our experience. 
  • In some cases these scars can be treated with surgical scar revision as well, usually in combination with laser and scar therapy.